Home Inspection Reports: What To Expect

Influenced by changes in economic and legal environments during the past 30 years, home inspection reports have been changing to accommodate the growing expectations of customers and to provide complete information and protection, both for inspectors and for Your clients.

Influenced by changes in economic and legal environments during the past 30 years, home inspection reports have been changing to accommodate the growing expectations of customers and to provide complete information and protection, both for inspectors and for Your clients.

If you are not affiliated with any professional inspection organization and your report does not meet any particular standard, another inspector should be sought.

In general, reports should describe the most important systems of a home, its key components, and its operability, especially those in which a failure can result in dangerous or costly conditions to correct.

Reports should also exclude uninspecting portions of the home. As home inspections are visual, parts of the home hidden under the floor, ceiling, or ceiling should be excluded.

Home inspectors are not experts in every housing system but are trained to recognize conditions that require inspection by a specialist.

The Standards of Practice were designed to identify the requirements of a home inspection and the limitations of an inspection.

Checklists and Descriptive Reports

Checklists are just this, very little is actually written. The report consists of a series of lockers with short descriptions to the side. The descriptions are often abbreviated, two or three words, such as “skipped paint.” The complete checklist can be four to five pages long. Today, some legal agreements are almost of the same extent!

Due to the lack of detailed information, the checklist reports may be open to interpretation, and buyers, sellers, agents, contractors, lawyers, and judges may interpret them differently, depending on their interests.

The Inspection Business

In the inspection business, the phrases that describe the conditions found during an inspection are called “stories.” Descriptive reports use descriptive language that more fully describes each condition. The descriptions here are not abbreviated.

Both checklists and descriptive reports are still used; however, many jurisdictions exclude reports type checklists because due to the limited information they provide result in legal problems.

Responsibility

From the point of view of responsibility, descriptive reports are considered widely safer, since they provide more information and expose it more clearly.

With the use of inspection software, in the “INTERIOR” program section, the inspector could check the box that says “some lamps do not work.” This would cause a story to appear in the “INTERIOR” section of the inspection report:

“Some lighting devices in the house seem to be inoperable. The lamps may be burned, or there may be problems with the accessories, wiring, or switches.”

If, after replacing the lamps, these lights continue to fail when the switch is operated, this condition may mean a dangerous situation, and the inspector recommends the evaluation and necessary repairs that a qualified electrical contractor must perform.”

Typical phrases and other information may be pre-selected to appear automatically in the report.